Disaster Recovery

March 2015

Business Continuity

When disaster strikes a business - whether failure of IT facilities, data loss, power failure, severe weather, fire or flood, illness of key personnel, or other circumstances impacting normal business operations – the adverse effect on business continuity can be very significant.

Many organisations have a business continuity plan to deal with such disasters. Such plans invariably include arrangements for specific alternative IT facilities to be triggered when a disaster occurs. Without adequate arrangements a business may be at serious risk of failure when struck by a disaster causing loss of use of key IT facilities or data loss or damage.

Some businesses provide such arrangements for themselves, but typically they instead outsource those arrangements.

Disaster Recovery documents

Our brand new package of IT disaster recovery documents consists of new agreement templates for use by an IT company offering IT disaster recovery services to others. We have created three forms of Disaster Recovery Agreement for use by commercial providers of such services. There are forms of agreement under which providers can supply hardware and/or software, office accommodation, and other IT services.

Cloud services

We will shortly be adding further new documents to this new package, to cover supply of data back up and data recovery services, and we expect that over the next few months we will also be supplementing this package with a number of new agreements for IT companies to offer various cloud computing services.

The contents of this Newsletter are for reference purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. Independent legal advice should be sought in relation to any specific legal matter.

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