Wesite Disclaimers and Royalty Agreements

August 2010

The Trading document folder sees two new releases this month:
- Website Disclaimers
- Royalty Agreements

Website Disclaimers

Simply-Docs has created a set of website disclaimers for use with a variety of websites. Many of these disclaimers are based upon those found in our existing website terms & conditions, with new versions drafted for use on humour / satire websites and an all-important earnings disclaimer for use on websites offering products or services designed to enhance the earnings, profitability or similar of clients’ own services or businesses.

Nobody in their right mind should make an important decision based on only one source of information. In many cases, therefore, website disclaimers are not telling visitors anything they did not already know. For the small minority of users for whom further enquiry is not a matter of course, a disclaimer acts as either a useful reminder or, in the worst case, protects the owner of the website in the event of a claim arising out of a visitor whose sole reliance on the information provided by that website has landed them in hot water.

Royalty Agreements

A new set of Royalty Agreements has been created, based on our popular Licence Agreements. The new documents are designed to cater for copyright, trade marks and patents. A specific Author’s Agreement has been created, in addition to a standard royalty contract designed for use with a broad range of subject-matter.

Licences may be granted for any number of purposes and over a wide variety of subject matter. In its simplest form, the relationship under many licences will be a party which owns something allowing another party to use that something in return for payment.

Payment under licences often takes the form of royalties – regular payments which are generally a percentage of income generated by the licensee’s activities.

The contents of this Newsletter are for reference purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. Independent legal advice should be sought in relation to any specific legal matter.

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