Dealing with Grievances and HR Policy documents

November 2013
EMPLOYEE GRIEVANCE DOCUMENTS

This month, Simply-Docs has added three documents to its suite of documents helping employers to handle and resolve employee grievances fairly.

Grievances can be defined as concerns, problems or complaints raised by an employee or worker. The way a grievance is handled is important because, if a tribunal upholds a complaint by an employee in a situation where the ACAS Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Procedures is relevant, and it is found that either side unreasonably failed to comply with one or more of the Code's requirements, the tribunal can, as a result, adjust compensation by up to 25%, either up or down.

The grievance documents are:

• The Formal Grievance Record Form, which should be used to keep clear and consistent records of employees’ grievances and the decisions reached in respect of these grievances;
• The Receipt of Grievance Letter, used to acknowledge receipt of an employee’s formal grievance; and
• The Letter Advising An Employee That A Formal Grievance Has Been Raised Against Them. This is for use in circumstances where an employer has to advise an employee that another employee has raised a formal grievance against him or her.

OUTSIDE BUSINESS INTERESTS POLICY AND DRESS AND APPEARANCE POLICY

In addition to the grievance documents, there are two other policies which have been written to help employers define their expectations of employees: the Outside Business Interests Policy and the Dress and Appearance Policy.

The Outside Business Interests Policy is for use where an employer wishes to restrict employees’ outside activities (such as freelance work, involvement in a family business or second jobs) because, for instance, such activities may leave employees too tired to carry out their normal job and responsibilities or reluctant to do overtime or weekend work. The Dress and Appearance Policy has been written to help the employer draw up guidelines for acceptable standards of dress and personal appearance in the workplace and on company business.

The contents of this Newsletter are for reference purposes only and do not constitute legal advice. Independent legal advice should be sought in relation to any specific legal matter.

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